“Modeling Increased Demand of Energy for Air Conditioners and Consequent CO2 Emissions to Minimize Health Risks Due to Climate Change in India” discusses predictable increases in demand on energy sources in developing countries situated mostly in latitudes that are projected for the highest climate change impact in the twenty-first century.

India was chosen, as the country presents a unique opportunity to understand this phenomenon in a large developing country.

The study, which recently appeared in the Journal of Environmental Science and Policy, found that climate adaptation policies in India should consider the significance of air conditioners (A/C) in mitigation of human vulnerability due to unpredictable weather events, such as heat waves. However, the energy demand due to A/C usage alone will be in the range of an extra ~750,000 GWh to ~1,350,000 GWh with a 3.7 C increase by the year 2100. The study further revealed A/C usage by 2100 will result in CO2 emissions of 592 Tg to 1064 Tg. This is significant given that India's total contribution to global CO2 emissions in 2009 was measured at 1670 Tg and the country's residential and commercial electricity consumption in 2007 was estimated at 145,000 GWh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2010.09.009

Ferrand-Akpinar, E and A. Singh. 2010. “Modeling Increased Demand of Energy for Air Conditioners and Consequent CO2 Emissions to Minimize Health Risks Due to Climate Change in India”. Journal of Environmental Science & Policy, doi: 10.1016/j.envsci.2010.09.009 (in press).