Participants work with real communities to develop projects ready to present to donors. Urban participants can partner with participants in developing nations to gain community contact.

OL 341: Adapting to Climate Change 1: The Community Focus

13 JULY - 30 AUGUST (SIX WEEKS)

What is climate change adaptation? What does this mean at the community level? What practical tools are available today for communities to use in adaptation? How do we incorporate these into a project design? How do you transfer knowledge? For practitioners who wish to begin working now at the community level to successfully adapt to the challenges that face us.

Adapting to Climate Change 1: A Community Focus

This pair of courses, OL 341 and 342, are a continuation of OL 101 and 102 where course participants worked on-the-ground with communities to develop real projects.

A number of these students developed climate adaptation projects — they just didn't realize it. For example, there are student projects in Yemen, Morocco, Tanzania and Cameroon where communities that had water 10 years ago suddenly have none since the community’s spring dried up.

Pastoralists are faced with extended drought in sub-Saharan Africa, their cattle are dying and their husbands and sons are migrating. Mongolian pastoralists are suffering from a Zud: multiple natural disasters illustrated this year by the parching of pastures in summer followed by bitter cold and deep snow in winter.

This is the reason that 101 and 102 are a requirement: students are bringing projects such as these that they developed in those two courses for further development and refinement in this course.

So how do we determine if these terrible situations are linked to climate change, and if so how do we begin improving our projects so that communities can adapt?

For many field staffers it may feel overwhelming to start an adaptation project. It might the lack of know-how: where do you begin, where is information available, what practical tools are working, how do you convey this concept to the community?

It seems that much of what we read about adaptation is academic or focused on impacting policy at the governmental level. These are necessary and important, but what does one do for information for projects on the ground?

Two principle questions that we will be working on in this course are:
  1. How do I know if my community project is linked to climate change?
  2. If so, what practical, community-centered adaptation tools, solutions and activities are available today that I can actually include in my project?

We will be investigating a down-to-earth understanding of whether we are faced with climate change projects, and what user-friendly, implementable and sustainable adaptation tools can be used by field staff today at the community level.

We supply two levels of mentoring. Each week’s assignment will be accompanied by a clear, professional example of what we want you to achieve that week. We will also provide comments, suggestions and encouragement for each one of your assignments individually. We want you to develop high quality outputs, and we also want you to understand the hows and whys.

The classes are designed to be fun and interactive: you will not only be working with your community, you will be collaborating with colleagues from around the globe.

Who should attend? Southern and Northern development students, field staff, grant writers, project managers, directors, and donor staff.

Course syllabus

Week 1: Evidence.
Week 2: Definition
Week 3: Community.
Week 4: Tools.
Week 5. Sustainability.
Week 6. Leadership.

The second course, OL 342, will continue with project implementation: OL 342: Adapting to Climate Change 2: Sustainable Implementation.
  1. Project management with a community perspective.
  2. Engaging the community in project launch.
  3. Skill Sets: A family of workshops on the solutions your community will use in the adaptation process.
  4. Learning tools: Monitoring and evaluation.
  5. Community Empowerment: Project hand-over.
  6. Sustainability: Post activity follow-up, support, and mentoring

Course Fees

There are prerequisites for taking this course: OL 101 and OL 102. Please don’t sign up for this course if you haven’t successfully completed the prerequisites.

The 6-week course is $95.00 for citizens of developing nations living in a developing country (which includes an automatic $50.00 discount), and $145.00 for citizens/residents of developed countries if paid by June 22. If you have a question don't hesitate to contact us at: Online.Learning at csd-i.org .

Choose which price fits your profile and look for the corresponding number (1., 2., 3., etc.) in the dropdown payment menu.

  1. $95.00 for developing country citizens: Early Bird Discount - register by June 22
  2. $125.00 for normal registration after June 22
  3. $145.00 for developed country citizens: Early Bird Discount - register by June 22
  4. $175.00 for normal registration after June 22

Find more details at: http://www.csd-i.org/adapting-to-climate-change-1/

OL 342: Adapting to Climate Change 2: Sustainable Implementation.

7 SEPTEMBER - 18 OCTOBER (SIX WEEKS)

How do you manage a community-centered adaptation project? The importance of community engagement. Developing skill sets for your community to use in the adaptation process. Learning tools: monitoring & evaluation. Community empowerment during project hand-over. Sustainability, follow-up & mentoring.

Adapting to Climate Change 2: Sustainable Implementation

This pair of courses, OL 341 and 342, are a continuation of OL 101 and 102 where course participants worked on-the-ground with communities to develop real projects. A number of these students developed climate adaptation projects — they just didn't realize it.

In the last course, OL 341, we determined if our projects were indeed linked to climate change. We then assessed our vulnerabilities and investigated what potential solutions showed evidence for mitigating these challenges.

We worked with our communities to incorporate these adaptation solutions into our projects. And then we set up a leadership committee within the community to be our partner and to take over and manage the project after we've gone.

These adaptation projects are for the long-term. So we need to plan our project management to take that into consideration and to make sure that the community is fully engaged in the process. We also need to make sure that we sucessfully deliver a set of skills to the community so that they will be able to implement the project activities along side us.

One of the most important things that we need to be doing is to be monitoring the outputs and outcomes of the project for two reasons. One is as a short-term learning mechanism in case we need to adjust the project in-process. And two, since we did a baseline survey, we have the opportunity of deciding if we want to design a long-term impact analysis.

As we begin wrapping up our portion of the project implementation, we need to make sure that we properly orchestrate the project handover to the community. We need to begin this process of community ownership at the very beginning. But there will come a point when we officially hand them the baton.

But we can't simply desert them, they need to understand that we're still available — even from a distance.

Course syllabus

Week 1: Project Management – the community perspective
Week 2: Engaging the community in project launch.
Week 3: Skill Sets
Week 4: Learning tools: Monitoring and evaluation.
Week 5. Community Empowerment: Project hand-over.
Week 6. Sustainability: Post activity follow-up, support, and mentoring.

Course Fees

There are prerequisites for taking this course: OL 341. Please don’t sign up for this course if you haven’t successfully completed the prerequisites.

The 6-week course is $95.00 for citizens of developing nations living in a developing country (which includes an automatic $50.00 discount), and $145.00 for citizens/residents of developed countries if paid before August 17. If you have a question don't hesitate to contact us at: Online.Learning at csd-i.org .

Choose which price fits your profile and look for the corresponding number (1., 2., 3., etc.) in the dropdown payment menu.

  1. $95.00 for developing country citizens: Early Bird Discount - register by August 17
  2. $125.00 for normal registration after August 17
  3. $145.00 for developed country citizens: Early Bird Discount - register by August 17
  4. $175.00 for normal registration after August 17

Find more details at: http://www.csd-i.org/adapting-to-climate-change-2/