Course duration

13 July 2010 - 13 August 2010: 6 Weeks
(May 18, 2010 - June 28, 2010 for those of you taking OL 101 in March and April.)
Prerequisite for this course: OL 2.1: From the Ground Up

REGISTRATION CLOSES 21 MAY 2010

This Logframe will provide the basis for developing a detailed budget, a schedule, & a compelling project fact sheet - transforming the project into one that can be presented to donors & used for leading the effective management of the project once funded.

Project Architecture: Imbed impact into your project design with a set of powerful management tools: Logframes, budgets, compelling fact sheets. They will communicate to donors & stakeholders exactly what you are going to accomplish and can be used for effective management of the project once funded.

The classes are designed to be fun and interactive: you will be collaborating with colleagues from around the globe. You have the opportunity of creating your own personal field course by taking your assignments into the field; we will encourage you to collaborate with colleagues and donors during your project’s development.

This course will take your needs assessment and project concept developed in OL 2.1, and build a Logframe matrix. This Logframe will provide the basis for developing a detailed budget, a schedule, and a compelling project fact sheet—transforming the project into one that can be presented to donors—and used for leading the effective management of the project once funded.

Some of the assignments below suggest doing them in a community. This is not a requirement if it impractical for you, but this is where partnering with someone in the field can add depth to your experience. There are no books to buy - all course materials can be linked to, or downloaded from the course site.

If you have a question don't hesitate to contact us at: Online.Learning at csd-i.org .

Read the course announcement here

Course syllabus

Week 1:

We will take the project challenge, proposed solution, and activities that you developed in OL 2.1, and transform them into a simplified logframe.

Week 2:
  1. The focus will be on outcomes and impact, how the current world of development sees them. We will see how we can use them to improve the logframe.
  2. We will incorporate outcome and impact statements into the logframe, and begin adding indicators and means of verification in preparation for developing a monitoring and evaluation plan in the next course if this series, ‘Positive Outcomes’, which covers in detail the design of M&E plans.

Week 3:

You will each write a compelling project fact sheet for presentation to donors that is no longer than 2 pages. This concise, quick-to-read document can present a focused message to a donor.

Week 4:

We will take the activity list from the logframe and create a budget, and then apply costs to each of the different activities.

Week 5:
  1. We will take our detailed budget and transform it into a visual timeline/schedule.
  2. Make a list of 2 colleagues, 2 potential NGO partners, and two donors that you can share this working project proposal with. Make appointments with 3 of them.
Week 6:
  1. Share your project informally with a donor, your boss, your professor, someone in the development world for feedback. We will discuss why it is a good idea to visit a donor at this preliminary stage, and why you should wait on writing an actual proposal.
  2. We will polish this family of documents by including the constructive feedback, and by making sure that the docs are absolutely parallel to each other. We will then carefully print them out and make an appointment with a donor to present your project

Summary

This course will take the project concept developed in OL 2.1 and transform it with a powerful set of management tools into a project for presenting to donors. Logframes, detailed budgets, and compelling fact sheets: these tools will communicate to donors, staff, and stakeholders exactly what you are going to accomplish, and lead the effective management of the project once funded.

There are two very exciting aspects of the course. One is that participants are using the course to design real projects with real communities on the ground. The second is the cross-hemisphere partnerships between participants. We have people living in big cities (without access to communities) in Australia, Spain, Canada, the US, Brazil, and Panama, partnering on projects with on-the-ground field staff (with access to communities) in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Kenya, Columbia, Peru, and Venezuela.

Project development: It is with the community’s needs list that participants begin designing sustainable, impact-oriented projects. From needs assessments sent to us by course members, we have been able to see the many common problems worldwide including: Income generation, clean water, access to education, poor sanitation, gender equality, migration, lack of vocational skills, chronic diarrhoea and malnutrition in small children, lack of roads to villages, marginalization, shelter, food shortages, illiteracy, environmental degradation, drought, lack of irrigation for agriculture, and overpopulation.

Course fees

Course fees for both local citizens living in developing countries, and citizens of developed countries are as follows:
  1. $75.00 for developing country citizens: register by April 30
  2. $100.00 for late registration after April 30
  3. $125.00 for developed country citizens: register by April 30
  4. $150.00 for late registration after April 30

Registration and Payment

Find all details on registration and payment here

If you have a question don't hesitate to contact us at: Online.Learning at csd-i.org

To learn more about the courses please visit: http://www.csd-i.org/online-learning/